Driver Kit Update & $400 AA Battery Accident

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Broken MacBook Pro LCD

Driver Kit Update

It’s been a busy couple of weeks, both with my day job and working with suppliers to get the best price and quality on parts for the hybrid driver but I do have a driver kit update. I have finalized the supply chain and received all but the passive components and packaging materials. I expect everything to be here by the end of January. Once I have all the parts I’ll take the photographs for the plans, which will be available for free.
I also want to make a test rig for the hybrid driver ICs and the isolated DC to DC converters. They are critical components and cost a decent amount. I want to know that they are performing as expected before they go out in the kits or machines. I have a couple of ideas for building a simple but detailed and accurate Arduino based performance curve profiler similar to those used for testing transistors, diodes, and other electronic components. In the meantime, I’m getting back into the code using the two new driver boards I build from the spare components.
 

$400 AA Battery Accident

I dropped a harmless little AA on my desk while changing the batteries in my mouse. The battery bounced and rolled away, I didn’t think much about it. A few minutes later I noticed my screen took a hit… awesome. The outer glass isn’t even cracked. It was one of the substrate layers that broke and let out all the magic liquid crystals. Looking around for a replacement LCD for my MacBook Pro Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2014 it seems like $300-$390 is the price range, ouch! I saw some cheaper off brands but this is a beautiful Retina display, and I don’t want to change it out for some knockoff junk LCD.
I have been looking at the new MacBook Pros, but I genuinely don’t like them. The taskbar is a POS gimmick, and the keyboard feels like a toy. I switched to using MacBooks around 2009 when I got fed up with Windows interfering with my work. An [NTFS file system error] blue screen of death the night of a large network activation for AT&T Lightspeed/U-verse was the last straw. I went out and bought my first Mac the next day.
Yes, Mac hardware is costly, but it JUST WORKS! It is always something with Windows. I was tired losing valuable time fixing issues, updating, reinstalling, etc. The MacBooks I have used have ALWAYS worked rock solid. I run CleanMyMac to keep things tidy and a Time Machine at home which is the most intuitive and real world usable backup system ever, for a personal computer at least.
I didn’t mean for this to be a MacBook fanboy review or a windows roasting session, I still use windows too. Personal my favorite OS is Debian, maybe I’ll get a Linux computer. Probably not though, I just run VMware when I need it locally. Besides, I do love the integration between all my devices that Apple affords i.e., desktop, laptop, tablet, phone, TV, etc… It’s just that this is the first physical problem I’ve ever had with a Mac and honestly I’m sort of surprised how easy it broke considering how rough I’ve been on them over the years.
I’m going to order a screen today. I just tell myself, “Don’t worry, you can sell this Mac for about a grand when you upgrade!” Still, what a disappointing accident.

IGBT Driver – Out With The Old, In With The New (Year)

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IGBT Driver PCB

First off, happy New Year! I hope that everyone is doing well in 2018. The first batch of IGBT Driver boards (Hybrid Driver v1.3) from PCBWay came in today, and they look great! 🙂

IGBT Driver Old And New - PCBWay

PCBWay Manufacturer

This order was my first time using PCBWay and I am blown away by how seamless from end to end the entire process is! I love the technological process tracking, it’s funny, but it reminds me a bit of how some pizza places track the progress of your pizza. My order was accepted, manufactured, shipped and in my shop in no time at all!

The quality of the boards, through-hole plating, silkscreen, bottom side tinning, and everything is a definite A+. I received excellent communication and engineering cooperation from the beginning. Although there are other PCB manufacturers that I like, I am going to use these guys going forward! I’d recommend them for prototyping or production.

PCBWay Technological Process Tracking

Open Source Advocate

I especially like that they encourage open source projects by allowing you to share your board designs, schematics, and project details after ordering. Here is the Hybrid Driver v1.3 in PCBWay’s project sharing section.  They make it easy for others to order boards since all the Gerber files are already there and pre-approved. They even give a 10% back to the project creator. Check it out and take a look at there projects, there are some impressive ones. I like OpenReflow, a control board to convert a simple toaster oven into an accurate reflow oven for soldering SMD components.

IGBT Driver

The new driver boards look great. I like the high gloss black solder mask and the highly visible white silkscreen over it. The slots for the IGBT gate connections turned out great. The board edges are clean and completely burr free. The only mistake I’ve found is that I forgot to set the OSH logo font to vector, so it expanded a bit and overlapped the G2 silkscreen. I also tweaked a few device name silkscreen positions to improve visibility.

IGBT Hybrid Driver v1.3

I’m waiting for the bulk orders of the VLA106-15242 isolated DC to DC converters and the M57962L gate drivers. After that, I’ll stuff the boards and get them in the ReactorForge to continue refining the firmware.


IGBT Driver Stuff Board

The First Kit

I’m planning on making the IGBT Driver (Hybrid Driver v1.3) the first complete kit. Of course, it will be standalone, apart from the rest of the induction heater. I’m ok with having the major components of the induction heater available individually as well as part of the whole machine kit.

I have never made a kit like this, but I am entirely confident that I can put together a great one. Still, this will give me the chance to test that confidence on a smaller scale. I’ve already established a supply chain for the parts and the PCB. What’s left is ordering consumables such as antistatic shielding bags, labels, and packaging. Then, of course, the written plans or instructions for the kit.