ReactorForge Web Store

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RF-HD2 Hybrid Driver Kit

It finally happened or is happening or… whatever. I spend about  30 hours over the weekend and set up the ReactorForge web store, or shop. Web store sounds silly to me but that is was it is. I added the four products that are available now including those that were part of the Patreon give away. 

Plans (How-tos)

I’ve taken all the photos needed for the Hybrid Driver Plans and am finishing that so it will be ready by the time the first kit hits your bench.

RF-HD2 Hybrid Driver

The store and the first written set of plans lays an essential foundation. To “rinse and repeat” for each component and system in this formidable induction heater!

The Patreon Giveaway

Some of you have already sent your shipping address, but I’m switching things up a bit for the better. Rather than just shipping the parts out to those addresses manually, I’ve sent each of you a coupon code good for the exact value of those components to use in the web store as you like.

Since some of you have asked for extra items, this will also make it easier for you to add on what you like. If you select just the items in the giveaway and use the “Standard: Free” shipping option your cart total will be zero, and no payment info will be required. If you add anything extra, you can currently select from the following payment options.

  • Stripe (prominent credit card processor)
  • Amazon Pay
  • PayPal
  • Apple Pay (if you are on an Apple device).

Web Store

It looks like I have the kinks worked out of the web store. If you do happen to notice anything, please let me know. For now, it’s back to the important work, improving the design, documenting and sharing it! Thank you all for your patience and support during its development.

New Post Notifications & Web Store Setup

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New Post Notifications

If you subscribe to new post notifications, you may have seen a few come in this afternoon as I’m clearing out old language translations in preparation for the web store. In the past, I used the Lingotek and Polylang plugins to auto-translate pages and post to all major languages since there was so much interest in this overseas. However, I have noticed some very irritating issues and bugs with the two plugins.

In the process of setting up a web store, I had to get rid of them entirely. While working on it, WordPress decided that all the existing posts were new and set out notifications. How irritating, I apologize for any unnecessary emails you may have received if you subscribe to new post notifications.

Web Store

ReactorForge Webstore

The good news is all those bugs are gone, and the new ReactorForge web store is set working. I’m currently only supporting payments through PayPal but I do plan on adding at least one other payment gateway as I add more items. PayPal does, however, cover most everything even if you want to check out as a guest (not make an account on ReactorForge or PayPal).

Right now there are only two items in the store, the Matching Transformer Ferrite Core and the IGBT Hybrid Driver Kit. As soon as I finish installing the theme, I’ll open it up. I will also be sending out a coupon to each of the patrons that fall into this group to handle the giveaway more professionally.

I have received all the passive components for the Hybrid Driver kit, and I am putting together a PDF manual for assembly and use that will be freely available on the Plans page. As soon as the packing materials show up, I can start shipping.

Trade War
Boo Tariffs

I honestly didn’t think it would affect this much. Back in June, the United States announced it was set to impose a 25% tariff on over 800 categories of Chinese goods. A BOM that I had loaded into Digi-Key before June for another kit was about $320, now with prominent red tariff adjustment notifications all over, it is at $412. That’s a big chunk for a small project! It just means I’ll have to work a little harder on the supply chain moving forward.

Happy March!

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Jeremiah's Knives
Good morning and can you believe it’s March already? Wow! Now that Chinese New Year is past the last of the packaging materials for the IGBT Hybrid Driver kits have shipped. I’m now looking forward to getting it all packaged up. I have some fun and unique ideas for the packaging as well. 🙂
Between ice and snow days, three kids with the flu, then me with it for a couple of days and throw some travel in there I’ve been working on the guide for the kit a bit more. It is coming together beautifully, and I enjoy working on it. But to be honest, I’m most excited to get back to work on finishing the main code. However since the drivers are a crucial part of the overall kit, this is time well spent.

Forging Ahead

On another note, while my brother Daniel is in the process of moving I let a friend, Jeremiah borrow the original induction heater. Jeremiah has been making knives for the better part of last year using stock blanks and handcrafting the handles from various materials. He wanted to get his feet wet forging his own blades from scratch but doesn’t have the area or set up for a flame forge. Maybe we’ll get some nice pictures or even a video or three. He is new to forging but has been studying the last few months, so he was ready for the IH!
Here is some of Jeremiah’s recent work. I believe he said these were Christmas presents this past year. 
 Jeremiah's Knives
I’ve met others with impressive talents in blade crafting like Larry Fahnoe, check out his creations too! I am truly excited to see more people with access to induction heating and what they’ll do with it.

IGBT Driver – Out With The Old, In With The New (Year)

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IGBT Driver PCB

First off, happy New Year! I hope that everyone is doing well in 2018. The first batch of IGBT Driver boards (Hybrid Driver v1.3) from PCBWay came in today, and they look great! 🙂

IGBT Driver Old And New - PCBWay

PCBWay Manufacturer

This order was my first time using PCBWay and I am blown away by how seamless from end to end the entire process is! I love the technological process tracking, it’s funny, but it reminds me a bit of how some pizza places track the progress of your pizza. My order was accepted, manufactured, shipped and in my shop in no time at all!

The quality of the boards, through-hole plating, silkscreen, bottom side tinning, and everything is a definite A+. I received excellent communication and engineering cooperation from the beginning. Although there are other PCB manufacturers that I like, I am going to use these guys going forward! I’d recommend them for prototyping or production.

PCBWay Technological Process Tracking

Open Source Advocate

I especially like that they encourage open source projects by allowing you to share your board designs, schematics, and project details after ordering. Here is the Hybrid Driver v1.3 in PCBWay’s project sharing section.  They make it easy for others to order boards since all the Gerber files are already there and pre-approved. They even give a 10% back to the project creator. Check it out and take a look at there projects, there are some impressive ones. I like OpenReflow, a control board to convert a simple toaster oven into an accurate reflow oven for soldering SMD components.

IGBT Driver

The new driver boards look great. I like the high gloss black solder mask and the highly visible white silkscreen over it. The slots for the IGBT gate connections turned out great. The board edges are clean and completely burr free. The only mistake I’ve found is that I forgot to set the OSH logo font to vector, so it expanded a bit and overlapped the G2 silkscreen. I also tweaked a few device name silkscreen positions to improve visibility.

IGBT Hybrid Driver v1.3

I’m waiting for the bulk orders of the VLA106-15242 isolated DC to DC converters and the M57962L gate drivers. After that, I’ll stuff the boards and get them in the ReactorForge to continue refining the firmware.


IGBT Driver Stuff Board

The First Kit

I’m planning on making the IGBT Driver (Hybrid Driver v1.3) the first complete kit. Of course, it will be standalone, apart from the rest of the induction heater. I’m ok with having the major components of the induction heater available individually as well as part of the whole machine kit.

I have never made a kit like this, but I am entirely confident that I can put together a great one. Still, this will give me the chance to test that confidence on a smaller scale. I’ve already established a supply chain for the parts and the PCB. What’s left is ordering consumables such as antistatic shielding bags, labels, and packaging. Then, of course, the written plans or instructions for the kit.

Bluetooth Telemetry Link

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Bluetooth Telemetry

This Bluetooth serial link is nothing new. I had it working on the existing setup to send data from the ReactorForge control board to the Processing visualization program. The HC-06 Bluetooth module enabled me to see the live telemetry coming from the ReactorForge. That helps you to understand what is going on and tweak parameters such as the PID settings.

Consolidation of Development Process

I’m excited to get the entire development process in one operating system. Before, I was bouncing between macOS, Windows in VMWare Fusion on the Mac, and a separate Windows machine. It’s a long story, but this was partly due to the Windows-only compiler I used at the time. Other shortcuts I made early in the process just to get things working enough to get the induction heater to Daniel’s shop also helped put me in that spot.

Problems Connecting to the HC-06 Bluetooth Module on Mac

Getting the HC-06 Bluetooth to Serial module working on macOS wasn’t hard, but I did have one issue. The HC-06 seemed to just disconnect randomly after a minute or two of being connected. Then when I would try to reconnect to it, the port would be busy. I knew it wasn’t busy or open using lsof | grep HC-06 or whatever your’s is named, Reactor-Link in my case.

I fired up Windows in VMware Fusion and paired the HC-06 Bluetooth module. Then I opened a connection to it using a terminal program. I also began a screen session (terminal) on the Mac side with a USB to serial adapter. The USB serial adapter was connected to the HC-06 Bluetooth module to monitor it (and send data from it).

Anyway, this worked fine, and the HC-06 Bluetooth module never lost connection on the Windows side. I did notice that on the Windows side, the HC-06 Bluetooth module asked me for asked me for the pin number during the pairing process, but it did not ask on the Mac side. I removed the device from on the Mac side in the Bluetooth manager and re-Paired it. To my annoyance and relief, this fixed the disconnecting issue. Maybe I changed the pin in the past since the last time it had been connected to the Mac.

Bluetooth on macOS

So this is the simple test setup. The photos say it all I think.

Bluetooth Telemetry

Bluetooth Telemetry

Bluetooth HC-06.pdf

Libraries, Drivers, Etc.

With that working, I’m going to work on the libraries now. I’m looking at whether or not to get the existing libraries working in the new environment or use new libraries.  I’m leaning toward new libraries because there are quite a few compiler warnings and even some errors from the old ones. I’ll have to update function names and setup code, but I’d prefer to start with something cleaner and updated. I’m pushing it all to GitHub as I go!

Addition Terminal Jargon

The astute reader might notice that I am using the /dev/tty.* version of the device rather than the /dev/cu.* version. So, what’s the difference? TTY devices are for calling into UNIX systems, whereas CU (Call-Up) devices are for calling out from them (e.g., modems). We want to call-out, so /dev/cu.* is the correct device to use.

The technical difference is that /dev/tty.* devices will wait (or listen) for DCD (data-carrier-detect) e.g., someone calling in, before responding. /dev/cu.* devices do not assert DCD, so they will always connect (respond or succeed) immediately. Since neither the HC-06 Bluetooth module or the USB to serial adapter support DCD it’s not an issue. Still, following best practice, you should use the correct port.

So why did I use the wrong one in the photos? I switched to /dev/tty.* when I was having the connection issue and just forgot to switch back before documenting it.

Development Environment

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Development Environment

If you follow the GitHub repository https://github.com/ThingEngineer/ReactorForge by clicking [Watch] you may have noticed work on the firmware. I’ve begun setting up the new development environment. Going forward, I don’t want to deal with switching to Windows to work in AVR Studio. I never liked that environment anyway. I had talked about possibly moving everything into the Arduino environment because of its popularity, however that has its own set of issues. For starters, support for the AT90PWM family of chips isn’t there, and I don’t want to spend the time to add it. Then there’s this:

https://atom.io + https://atom.io/packages/platomformio = frickin awesome

Beginning Development Environment

Arduino is a great prototyping platform and IDE to get started on if you have never worked with microcontrollers. As a beginner, it can get you building projects faster than any other platform out there. But eventually, the features that make it convenient and easy to use can hold you back. It lacks many features which make writing code quicker, easier, and have become quite standard in modern text editors. There are also bits of code that get inserted into your code that can cause some very head-scratching issues.

Moving Beyond Arduino

The next logical step is to leave the Arduino IDE behind. We do that by working in a more fully-featured development environment. Atom + PlatformIO is my new favorite open source cross-platform IDE. It even comes with the Arduino framework among others. That lets you test drive it with a code structure you are familiar. When you are ready, you can remove the training wheels and go full native C++. There is so much more I could brag about with both of these tools. But I’ll let you discover the awesomeness yourself!

Development Environment

Next Steps

What’s next? I’m going to begin porting over the libraries used in the existing project. Then the main code, and start rewriting, optimizing, etc. The photo above is a test rig I used for setting up the new IDE. I will continue to use it throughout the porting process. Once the code is stable in its new environment, I’ll switch over to the ReactorForge!

I had also planned on using this setup to demo and explain the basics behind the AT90PMW software PLL setup. I’ll get to that but for now, it’s back to work in the new development environment!

Patreon Charges and 260 Pound Parts Delivery for IH Kit

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Patreon Charges

There has been a lot of confusion created by they way Patreon charges its patrons and paying creators. You can find the official information can here: https://patreon.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/115005631963 And here is another excellent article on the topic by TechCrunch.

TLDR; The short version is, Patreon moved its credit card processing service fees from the creator to the patron. Because of this change, Patreon was able to lower the overall fee amount and give more to the creator. The fee amount is (2.9% + $0.35) for each monthly pledge.

Because I have worked on unique e-commerce projects, I understand the intricacies and complications of bulk credit card processing, multiple payees, and the associated charges and chargeback liabilities. However, I do not support Patreon’s decision, and I firmly believe there is a better solution. Because Patreon is a goodwill engine, I think this move is, for lack of better terms, just weird. In addition, I won’t personally be canceling any of my Patreon pledges. Nevertheless, as a patron myself and now a fledgling creator, I do hope that we see these processing fees moved back to the creator.

Other Support Options

Your support is much appreciated, but entirely voluntary. You may continue to make a small donation to support the project and website using Patreon. If you decide to cancel out of principal, I understand entirely. If you prefer I’ve added a PayPal button on the pledge page “Coffee” to enable you to make a small reoccurring monthly pledge that you can change or cancel it at any time.


Support the ReactorForge via PayPal



Or you can send a one-time pledge. Please include a note to let me know it’s a gift and what made you decide to support ReactorForge!




I may add members only functionality to the website linked to Patreon PayPal as well, to mirror and even enhance the capabilities Patreon offers. But I’m not sure there is indeed a need for that yet, or possibly ever. Thank you all again for your support, be it monetary, intellectual, or constructive criticism. I value all of it!

ReactorForge Parts Delivery

I just received the first shipment of parts for building more ReactorForge induction heaters, 258 pounds worth. This component is of one particular importance and one I have settled on despite other possible changes I will be making to the design. Anyone care to take a guess what part this is?

ReactorForge Induction Heater Parts Shipment ReactorForge Induction Heater Parts Shipment

Mains Power Feed Complete

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Mains Power

This is the last mains power update for the ReactorForge Induction Heater. It will be the last because it’s complete! Here is how the last couple days of that process went.

Mains Power

I started by connecting the jumpers from the custom splice connector to the 60 Amp 240-volt dual pole breaker and ground bus. The photo shows green hooked to the neutral bus. I later moved this as I did not need to tap 120-volt like I thought I would have to since the ATX power supply runs on 240-volt now. (I just forgot, it’s been a while.)

Mains Power

And here is the 240-volt quick disconnect assembly installed and ready. I will print another version of the slide lock. The slides should be solid so the splice connectors are not accessible while the wires are disconnected.

Mains Power

Next, I prepared the 2 AWG mains power feeder lines. These will connect the splice block directly to the input of the ReactorForge.

Mains PowerMains Power

The splice block side has thick metal tabs that are double layered with heat-shrink tubing. These provide a high current, high durability connection to the screw terminal that will stand up to multiple connect/disconnect cycles.

Mains Power

The Induction Heater side has heavy duty lugs that will accept the terminal post. These are also insulated with double layers heat-shrink.

Mains Power

Bringing It All Together

And here you can see the feeder lines connected to the input of terminal posts on the back of the ReactorForge. I also ran a USB extension with a small hub for connecting the Atmel ISP programmer. I put the Bluetooth dongle here as well. It communicates with the mainboard to send/receive commands and system telemetry.

Mains PowerMains Power

I then installed a variac between the mains contactor and the inverter input filter.

Mains Power Variac

When software activates the contactor, 240 volts directly feeds the inverter typically. Since I have a decent amount of testing to do, I severed that connection and installed the variac to allow lower power testing.

Mains Power

I taped up the small areas where 240 volts was accessible in the front to avoid accidental contact or tools shorting things out. Getting my fingers across 240-volt mains power is not something I want to experience twice!

Mains Power VariacMains Power

On To The CODE!

That’s it for cooling and mains power connections. The next step is to get the programming environment set back up. I will turn things up as is and do some testing to make sure everything is still good. Once that is done I will get right to the next big task, I’ve decided to port the entire thing to Arduino. This won’t be too difficult since the code is already in C and I will be glad to get away from AVR Studio, to be honest. I made the choice to move to Arduino due to is massive use and rise in popularity over the last few years. Since this is an open source project I want to use a platform that people are familiar with. Let’s put industrial level induction heaters right up there with open source 3D printer firmware!

Nylon 3D Print of the 240V Quick Disconnect

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3D Print 240V Quick Disconnect

In my last post, I showed a prototype 3D print of the 240V Quick Disconnect. Here are the results of the final 3D print.

Nylon 3D Print

I’ve got the final version of the 240V Quick Disconnect printed in in natural colored Bridge taulman3D industrial high strength nylon. It is insanely strong! The first nylon 3D print failed because I forgot to include a skirt, so the edges curled up slightly, and I didn’t notice until it was complete. It still worked, but it bothered my OCD, so I reprinted another, only took an hour anyway. I ran over that first nylon print with my truck (laying flat), and it didn’t get so much as a scratch on it.

The slide lock completely prevents finger access to the Burndy splice connectors. Still, this is not something you should attempt if you are not familiar with electrical safety and codes. Your best bet is to higher an electrician to add a permanent outlet. This assembly setup is for testing purposes only, and I know what I’m doing. Don’t try this at home.

Safety First

Things you should understand if you do try this at home is the earth ground system in your home electrical wiring. You should also understand how NOT to overload circuits, that’s a significant fire hazard. The NEC can help here understand load maximums on a given wire gauge. Finally, understanding how transformers isolate you from the shocking truth will help you understand how the work coil is electrically separated from your home or shop AC grid.

Remember, Safety should always be first! The voltage and current coming from your wall outlets can kill and should always be respected.

Project ReCap and Photos

The updated CAD 3D print files are on on the Thingiverse Project. This assembly houses 3 Burndy splicers (PN: AMS2BAG2R). It does a few important things, it isolates them from each other, from the breaker box, and it snaps closed to prevent the lugs from sliding out (and attacking passer buys). On the side where the wires enter the assembly from the breaker, it is closed off except for holes just big enough for them, so it’s impossible for the splicers to slide out from that side. There are also ears on the front to keep the entire assembly from sliding all the way in the breaker box.

Power Progress – 240 Volt Quick Disconnect

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240V Quick Disconnect

In the photo below is my power test setup at home. Unfortunately, where my other shop is right now, I am unable to make changes like this. Here I explain what I did to get around that and make power progress!

DIY Induction Heater Power

Now that the ReactorForge is back on the bench it’s time to get it powered up!

This setup isn’t necessarily something that an inspector would like to see.  So don’t think this is my recommendation for a permanent solution. I’m just sharing what I did to make my current setup work. Keep in mind the breaker should always be OFF before connecting or disconnecting wires on the quick disconnect assembly.

To hook up 240 to the ReactorForge in this shop I have to run a temporary line. I don’t want to have to remove the breaker each time I do this, so I made an enclosure that mounts in a breaker slot. The assembly houses 3 Burndy splicers (PN: AMS2BAG2R). It does a few important things, it isolates them from each other, from the breaker box, and it snaps closed to prevent the lugs from sliding out (and attacking passer buys). On the side where the wires enter the assembly from the breaker, it is closed off except for holes just big enough for them, so it’s impossible for the splicers to slide out from that side. There are also ears on the front to keep the entire assembly from sliding all the way in the breaker box.

I printed a quick test in PLA, made a few changes and am ready to 3D print the final version in nylon after Thanksgiving. I’m sharing all the files here in case anyone else finds it useful. Be smart, be safe.

Power progress photos:

New Shop Power Panel

My problem is that I do not want to open up the panel and remove the breaker and wires every time I need to remove the temp line.

Power progress

Fusion 360 power splice quick connect

So I drew a simple small enclosure to house some common splice blocks made by Burndy.

The prototype:

 

The slide lock action:

Technical Drawing:

240V Quick Disconnect Drawing v10.pdf

*Tip: I usualy try to make a technical drawing before I 3D print a part. It’s quick and easy in Fusion 360 and saves me wasted prints and time redrawing later. I always catch a lot more looking at the drawing with multiple views and mesurements than just looking at the drawing in the viewport.

You can view and download the CAD files over at Thingiverse – 204 Volt Quick Disconnect Splice Housing