Nylon 3D Print of the 240V Quick Disconnect

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3D Print 240V Quick Disconnect

In my last post, I showed a prototype 3D print of the 240V Quick Disconnect. Here are the results of the final 3D print.

Nylon 3D Print

I’ve got the final version of the 240V Quick Disconnect printed in in natural colored Bridge taulman3D industrial high strength nylon. It is insanely strong! The first nylon 3D print failed because I forgot to include a skirt, so the edges curled up slightly, and I didn’t notice until it was complete. It still worked, but it bothered my OCD, so I reprinted another, only took an hour anyway. I ran over that first nylon print with my truck (laying flat), and it didn’t get so much as a scratch on it.

The slide lock completely prevents finger access to the Burndy splice connectors. Still, this is not something you should attempt if you are not familiar with electrical safety and codes. Your best bet is to higher an electrician to add a permanent outlet. This assembly setup is for testing purposes only, and I know what I’m doing. Don’t try this at home.

Safety First

Things you should understand if you do try this at home is the earth ground system in your home electrical wiring. You should also understand how NOT to overload circuits, that’s a significant fire hazard. The NEC can help here understand load maximums on a given wire gauge. Finally, understanding how transformers isolate you from the shocking truth will help you understand how the work coil is electrically separated from your home or shop AC grid.

Remember, Safety should always be first! The voltage and current coming from your wall outlets can kill and should always be respected.

Project ReCap and Photos

The updated CAD 3D print files are on on the Thingiverse Project. This assembly houses 3 Burndy splicers (PN: AMS2BAG2R). It does a few important things, it isolates them from each other, from the breaker box, and it snaps closed to prevent the lugs from sliding out (and attacking passer buys). On the side where the wires enter the assembly from the breaker, it is closed off except for holes just big enough for them, so it’s impossible for the splicers to slide out from that side. There are also ears on the front to keep the entire assembly from sliding all the way in the breaker box.

Power Progress – 240 Volt Quick Disconnect

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240V Quick Disconnect

In the photo below is my power test setup at home. Unfortunately, where my other shop is right now, I am unable to make changes like this. Here I explain what I did to get around that and make power progress!

DIY Induction Heater Power

Now that the ReactorForge is back on the bench it’s time to get it powered up!

This setup isn’t necessarily something that an inspector would like to see.  So don’t think this is my recommendation for a permanent solution. I’m just sharing what I did to make my current setup work. Keep in mind the breaker should always be OFF before connecting or disconnecting wires on the quick disconnect assembly.

To hook up 240 to the ReactorForge in this shop I have to run a temporary line. I don’t want to have to remove the breaker each time I do this, so I made an enclosure that mounts in a breaker slot. The assembly houses 3 Burndy splicers (PN: AMS2BAG2R). It does a few important things, it isolates them from each other, from the breaker box, and it snaps closed to prevent the lugs from sliding out (and attacking passer buys). On the side where the wires enter the assembly from the breaker, it is closed off except for holes just big enough for them, so it’s impossible for the splicers to slide out from that side. There are also ears on the front to keep the entire assembly from sliding all the way in the breaker box.

I printed a quick test in PLA, made a few changes and am ready to 3D print the final version in nylon after Thanksgiving. I’m sharing all the files here in case anyone else finds it useful. Be smart, be safe.

Power progress photos:

New Shop Power Panel

My problem is that I do not want to open up the panel and remove the breaker and wires every time I need to remove the temp line.

Power progress

Fusion 360 power splice quick connect

So I drew a simple small enclosure to house some common splice blocks made by Burndy.

The prototype:

 

The slide lock action:

Technical Drawing:

240V Quick Disconnect Drawing v10.pdf

*Tip: I usualy try to make a technical drawing before I 3D print a part. It’s quick and easy in Fusion 360 and saves me wasted prints and time redrawing later. I always catch a lot more looking at the drawing with multiple views and mesurements than just looking at the drawing in the viewport.

You can view and download the CAD files over at Thingiverse – 204 Volt Quick Disconnect Splice Housing 

Cooling is a GO

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Cooling - connected and flushed

I got the new fittings and hoses hooked up then flushed the water chiller and the induction heater. No leaks, cooling is a go!

Cooling - connected and flushed

Cooling - New metal base for cart

Before putting it back on the cart I replaced the top plastic liner with 16 gauge sheet metal that I cleaned and lightly wiped down with oil. I think I’ll go back and add a lip around 3 sides with the box break to catch any falling sparks and molten beads of metal that try to escape.

Back on the cart!

Cooling setup on cart

And here it is with cooling set up on the new cart.

Cooling setup on cart

Now to move on to power. I am making a quick disconnect near the breaker box. I will need to draw and 3D print a small enclosure for the 3/8″ dual splicers. More on that progress here.